Follow the link below for an excellent article by  Alex Bennett of the International Research Centre for  Japanese Studies:

Excerpt (page 53):

However, a more martial interpretation of bushido came into vogue again in the militarist 1930’s, and many Japanese soldiers read copies of the aforementioned Hagakure, or Bushido on the way to the front. In the aftermath of WWII, bushido fell into disfavour. Foreign and Japanese critics alike blamed bushido as representing all that was most loathsome in Japanese wartime behaviour. Many Japanese renounced bushido as part of the misguided militaristic ideology resulting in Japan’s defeat and shame, and as unsuited to their new post-war democratic society.

The thing with bushido is that it always has been, and always will be, open for interpretation. There is no one ‘school of bushido.’ Recent history has
shown that this makes the idea useful and potentially dangerous at the same time

Click Here.

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